Intercept

Intercept

A hard truth: homelessness still lives in the city

Photo+and+design+by+Mara+Dumitru
Back to Article
Back to Article

A hard truth: homelessness still lives in the city

Photo and design by Mara Dumitru

Photo and design by Mara Dumitru

Photo and design by Mara Dumitru

Photo and design by Mara Dumitru


Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






San Francisco, one of the most culturally diverse and fast-paced cities in the U.S., has transformed over the years. From exciting new technologies making their way into people’s homes to skyscrapers built in the heart of the city, San Francisco has seen it all. The one constant in the locals’ lives? The hundreds of homeless people sleeping outside in the cold. 

Photo and design by Mara Dumitru

Many tourists, like Mia and Rowan Cheshire  from Great Britain, think that “homeless people damage the image and reputation of not only Union Square, but the whole area in general.” The sisters said that although seeing people living on the streets makes them feel “pitiful and uncomfortable” and they said they would give food, they wouldn’t do anything else to help.

Photo and design by Mara Dumitru

Fred Stoney, a 19-year-old university student, feels similarly about the homeless. He said that seeing the homeless lying on the streets, begging for money and food, makes it less pleasurable to walk around and shop. Some of the homeless even approached Mr. Stoney, which made him feel scared and unsafe.

Stoney said that giving money is not the optimal solution. “I feel like there’s better ways to help them,” he said.

But in reality, every little act is appreciated by the homeless. 

Charlie Wells has been sleeping on the streets for the past two years due to multiple reasons, including an alcohol problem. In an attempt to make a living, he was painting abstract art on small canvas, hoping to sell them for $20 each.

Wells said that people should be more understanding towards the homeless, and try to sympathize with why people become homeless in the first place.

Photo and design by Mara Dumitru

According to the New York Times, last year’s deadly wildfires destroyed 14,000 residencies and left many people homeless. Given San Francisco’s rent prices, most  could not afford to buy a new house; even if they could, housing demand became even more pressing than before. Additionally, family and friends could not house victims of the fires permanently, which means that they were left to sleep on the streets. 

Wells’ problems can also be as basic as trying to find a bathroom. The many restaurants of San Francisco only allow paying customers to use their facilities, and according to Wells, the homeless shelters aren’t a desirable place. 

According to Wells, the homeless who sleep in shelters are “much more overprotective of their belongings,” resulting in “violence and tension” in the shelters. 

“I’m not a fan of the shelters,” Wells said. “I feel much safer sleeping in my tent on a quiet street.” 

Of all the changes San Francisco has gone through, the most pressing one is still ongoing.  

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Left
  • A hard truth: homelessness still lives in the city

    News

    Salesforce changes the culture and cityscape of SF

  • A hard truth: homelessness still lives in the city

    News

    Mission residents trapped in a “chasm of income”

  • A hard truth: homelessness still lives in the city

    Home

    The intricacies of change in San Francisco

  • A hard truth: homelessness still lives in the city

    News

    Salesforce changes the culture and cityscape of SF

  • A hard truth: homelessness still lives in the city

    Lifestyle

    Fashion-forward locals talk trends

  • A hard truth: homelessness still lives in the city

    Lifestyle

    San Francisco bookstores benefit from the Amazon age

  • A hard truth: homelessness still lives in the city

    Lifestyle

    Thrifting Evolves in the Bay Area

  • A hard truth: homelessness still lives in the city

    News

    Mission residents trapped in a “chasm of income”

Navigate Right
A hard truth: homelessness still lives in the city